Veterans of Kwajalein
Roi-Namur & the Pacific

 


Updated: 11/30/2015 10:52 PM ES

Submit your name, email address and veteran experience
at Kwajalein, Roi-Namur or the Pacific Region

Email info to:
shermiewiehe@gmail.com



CENSORED PHOTOS OF World War II


http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/03/18/captured-blog-the-pacific-and-adjacent-theaters/#more-1547


Operation Flint Lock

http://erasgone.blogspot.com/2013/02/flintlock-battle-for-kwajalein-atoll.html


Operation CASTLE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQEgndKhQ-U&authuser=0

Can You Help Me?

My Uncle, Harold Miller, was one of the Marines who fought on Kwajalein (per family legend). I am trying to find out which regiment he was in and perhaps someone who remembers him. He has been gone to us for a few years now but I would like to include his service on Kwaj as part of our Family History that I am researching and hope to publish some day.

Thank you, Joan Miller Riggs, Kwaj resident 2000-2003
Email: raisingalexis@gmail.com


Can't You Hear Them Marching?

Men from the Revolution and the
War between the State,
By cannon roar of grapeshot died each day,
Are listed in the book as heroes of this land,
As heroes of our land in every way.

Men fought a war in Texas and in old San Juan,
Where Teddy led them straight up the hill, 
The Marines at Kwajalein,
we remember in our hearts,
Remember in our hearts and always will.

In the World Wars heroes came to shoulder arms,
To fight to turn the tide of evil men.
Vietnam and in Korea are places warriors came,
Are places warriors came to fight again.

The cadence of their footsteps is still
pounding in my veins.
It is as if my heart beats like a drum,
Many more war heroes may answer the call,
May answer the call and forward come.
I saw a hero buried in the ground today;
A hero who died very far away.
He lay within his casket but his spirit marches on.
It marches on with others every day.

He's a soldier from Iraq and he
fought in Desert Storm;
Stepped forward twice to fight before he fell.
Yesterday his brother went down to re-enlist,
His mother cried but told him "Give em hell!"

Can't you hear them marching?
Each one marching straight and tall.
Can't you hear them marching?
They are heroes one and all.


Writer Ray, Palisade, NE
Email - wary1@curtis-ne.com

August 11, 2003

WWII VETs of Kwajalein & Roi-Namur

 

Kwajalein & Roi-Namur Vets Remembered

 

In Memory of Herbert H. Hice:  Hello Fellow Marine Corps Veterans Of Roi-Namur, Feb.1944 To Dec.1944   I was In Marine Aircraft Group 31, Headquarters Squadron.  I was a Staff Sgt.  On Feb. 12th,1944, I was wounded In the air raid On Roi-Namur and sent back to Hawaii on the same ship MAG 31 arrived on from Wallis Island, just south of the equator, "The Jane Adams".  I was In the Aiea Heights Naval hospital for 2 months and then shipped back to my squadron on Roi-Namur.  There I stayed until December 1944.  SEMPER FI Herb Hice. 

We just lost another U. S. Marine from MAG 31. Tech Sgt Leo Wissel from Boise, Idaho died March 9, 2012. We bunk together on Namur until I rotated back. Met with him in 1998 in Idaho, great man and Marine.  He will be missed. Ted Theriault, Ted34446@tampabay.rr.com

SGT. Raymond E. Charlebois, 86, a long-time Attleboro,Ma. resident, passed away, Saturday October 15, 2011.  He was a proud veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps serving in the Pacific Theatre of Operations during WWII, Marshall islands.  He will be missed. Ted Theriault, Ted34446@tampabay.rr.com
 

 

A test nuclear explosion codenamed "Baker", part of Operation Crossroads, at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, on July 25, 1946. The 40 kiloton atomic bomb
was detonated by the U.S. at a depth of 27 meters below the ocean surface, 3.5 miles from the atoll. The purpose of the tests was to study the effects of nuclear
explosions on ships. 73 ships were gathered to the spot -- both obsolete American and captured ships, including the Japanese battleship "Nagato".
(NARA)



 


Japanese Kawanishi H8K Seaplane after strafing on Kwajalein

 

WWII VETs of the Pacific


Satellite View of Roi-Namur
 


A
warding of the purple Heart Ceremony, Roi-Namur
Photo provided by the late Herbert H. Hice

World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient, Pvt. Richard Keith Sorenson, USMC

Former Marine First Lieutenant Richard Keith Sorenson, of New Brighton, Minnesota, was awarded this
Medal of Honor for his heroism at Kwajalein Atoll the night of 1-2 February 1944, when he threw himself
on an exploding Japanese grenade to save the lives of five fellow Marines. Miraculously, although fragments
of the grenade ripped through his thighs, hips, right arm and right leg, he lived through the action.

 

Veteran Information - Links, News and Updates

 
I am looking for info about my uncle William Dixie Morris.  William Dixie Morris was S Sgt in the US Army 32nd Infantry and was from Arkansas.  He was KIA February 4, 1944 on Kwajalien Island.  He knocked out a few machine gun nests but the forth one got him.  He received a Silver Star posthumously.  If anyone has info would be appreciated.  Ro​y Morris, CBET​, Director of Biomedical Engineering, Memphis, TN 38018, USA.  Email - roy.morris@babyheart.org
 

I am looking for info from anyone who knew my father Horace B. McBride.  He was called Jack. He served in the Marshall Islands conflict but I do not know which island.  He always said he was part of the Navy Seabees and operated a bull dozer.  He told of digging mass graves for dead soldiers. Juanette McBride Benigno, juanetteb@bellsouth.net

 
Looking for Information about John D. Flannery Cpl USMC  My uncle John D. Flannery Cpl USMC (Jack) was killed on Namur . I never knew him but would love any information regarding him. jtomcho@windsor-csd.org - Jack Tomcho
 
Looking for someone named Earl Namur  I found your site "Veterans of The Pacific" and thought I would give this a shot!  I am searching for anyone who might have know a man who I believe served on the USS New Mexico during WWII.  I have acquired some photos and bits of a scrapbook and journal writings from someone named Earl Namur, born Nov. 1, 1915.. I am not a relative and have come across these items in sort of complicated and sad way, and would love to find someone who might have known him. If you can be of help, I'd be grateful.  Thanks for your time, Shellie Bowman, goofycoa@yahoo.com, (719) 431-3715.

I would like to connect to anyone who served with Pfc. Kenneth Shepherd On June 6, 1944, he saved 4 men from drowning off Namur. For this Admiral Nimitz presented him with a medal for heroism. He was a member of a gun crew in an anti-aircraft artillery battalion and served 16 months in the South Pacific.  After WWII, he served as an rifle range coach at Parris Island.  Email > lineskater@aol.com  Posted: Feb. 26, 2008

Hourglass from September 1945  A few years ago, I had the opportunity to go through some of my father's belongings at my mother's house. As a child I knew that he had been a radio operator on Kwaj at the end of the war. Also as a child, I had seen a few photographs of him, which have since disappeared. While I was visiting at home, I took a scanner and notebook computer and scanned whatever I could get my hands on... In the papers was a copy of the Hourglass from September 1945. I found it interesting as an artifact and priceless as a piece of my father's history and experience. Since that time, I've done a fair amount of web surfing, and have found the page and various references to the Hourglass posted on this page. I thought perhaps someone else would enjoy the opportunity to share it, particularly in light of the content and date.

If it just so happens that anyone would have any information at all pertaining to my father's service time on Kwajalein, I would be most appreciative.. beyond that, I would just like to express my heart-felt appreciation for the sacrifices of those who have struggled there, died there and continue to serve. God Bless...

My father was: Frank (nmn) Kremm, Radioman (PO3 I believe at that time), USN.  He continued in the service of his country, retiring from the Navy in 1970. He passed away from cancer in 1977.

Sincerely, Frank J. Kremm

Do you recognize the man in this photo?

I am trying to locate veterans of WWII that might have known my father, Cpl Ostell Scarborough.  Though he never talked much about the war I have been able to piece together a minimum amount of information about his activities during WWII.  Originally assigned to SMS-61, MAG-61, 3rd MAW from March 1944 to Feb 1945, then SMS-31, MAG31, 4th MAW from Feb 1945 till ?  Most of Feb 1945 he was in the Kwajalein Army Provisional Hospital, I donít know the extent or type of injury.  The photo was taken sometime in early 1945.  He was a metal smith.  Any information you might provide would be sincerely appreciate.  Thank you for your service to our country.

Ostell Scarborough, Jr., oscarborough@skinnerco.com


Marine Aircraft Group (MAG-31) link on Military.com

Crossroads, Air Force Info Available  Just a short not to let you know that I have compiled a list of almost everyone in the Air Force that was involved in Crossroads including their name, rank, serial number and mos. So if anyone needs any of this information on an individual I'll be glad to help out!  Also have the numbers of the aircraft for the Air Transport Unit and where and when they were for almost any given period of time!  Jerry, email: GGredwood816@cs.com
A tribute to Marine - Lt. George Diemer Jr.

Lt. George Diemer Jr. was from Warrensburg, Missouri, and graduated from Central Missouri State Teachers College in 1940.  His father was president of the college.  He and his twin brother (my father) organized a dance band in college for a couple of years.  He taught high school for one year and joined the Marines in the summer of 1942.  With the Marines he went to Pensacola, Miami, Norfolk, and Paris Island.  He got to the South Pacific in September 1943 and eventually got to Roi, where he flew F4U-1 Corsairs.  He drowned following a crash on takeoff on May 26, 1944.  His body was recovered a few days later.  George W. Diemer III emailed data to Shermie Wiehe written by his uncle during the war.  Shermie provided George's story to other Marines of the Roi-Namur WWII battle.  Following this, WWII Navy Radioman, Craig Carmichael, who read George's story about his uncle sent an email to George W. Diemer III, informing him of witnessing his uncle's F4U-1 Corsair crash on Roi-Namur, shortly before being swept away into the ocean current.  To read more about this story and view pictures click > More about Lt. George Diemer Jr.
I'm looking for any information

I'm looking for any information, pictures, or recollections anyone might have of my father, Gene Carricart. He served on Kwajalein with 7th AAF, 392nd BS. Gene passed away 1959 when I was two, so I know next to nothing of his WWII service. Only picture I have of him during the war is here: http://www.prototype-design.com/temp/bugsbombyjr.jpg.  Gene was not flight crew as far as I know, but believe he worked on the B24, Bugs Bomby Jr.  Jon Anderson, janders@ncwebsurfer.com
Marines, do remember any ships we were on?

It has been 60 years plus since we were in the Pacific and the memory gets a little foggy after all those years. I remember leaving San Diego on the captured German luxury liner, the "Puebla". It was converted to a troop ship and the US Army operated it. It still had the elegant stairways from the first deck to the lower decks. We had the pleasure of sleeping in the troop area which was converted to rows of 5 bunks high and just barely enough isle space for two men to pass each other if you turned sideways. MAG 31 went to Pearl Harbor on this ship and I don't remember if we boarded another ship, It could have been the Typhoon heading south below the Equator on to Samoa and then on to Wallis Island. The second ship MAG 31 left Wallis Island for the invasion of the Marshall Islands was on the Jane Adams. The Jane Adams anchored in the lagoon near Roi-Namur. After The massive air raid by the Japs on February 12, 1944, MAG 31 took the most casualties and I was one of them. The wounded Marines and C-Bees were evacuated back to the Jane Adams, Still anchored in the Lagoon, Which was turned into a Hospital Ship. I don't know how many Marines and C-Bees were wounded but it was around 150 men. It took 3 weeks to get to the Aiea Heights Naval Hospital in Pearl Harbor. After about 2 months in the Hospital at Pearl Harbor, Most of us Marines from MAG 31 were put on board a ship heading to the Marshall Islands. I do not recall the name of that ship. It could have been the Santa Marie ??? We disembarked at Kwajalein Island and we were airlifted from Kwajalein to Roi-Namur, Back to MAG 31. I stayed on Roi-Namur until the end of December 1944. I was one of the Marines that were Rotated back to Stateside. They rotated the Marines after 1-1/2 years plus in the Pacific theater. I boarded a ship at Roi-Namur headed for Pearl Harbor. I do not recall the name of that ship either. After a short stay at Pearl Harbor, We headed to San Diego on the same Ship. Who would have thought I would be sending you this E-Mail after 60 years plus. I should have kept better records. I am sending this on to other interested Marines and maybe it will spark their memories a bit. If any of you Marines remember any ships we were on, Please feel free to tell me. Semper Fi, Herb Hice
Looking for Lawrence Good  I would appreciate any and all help you can provide and what help anyone else may be able to help with!  It has been a dream of mine to finally meet this man or his family face to face and thank him/them personally!  When on Iwo Jima my dad promised to name his 1st born son after Lawrence Good for saving him!  I would like to prove to him/them that HE KEPT HIS WORD!  My dad and I were both in the 4th Marine Division 14 Reg. artillery headquarters & service Co.  And again many thanks for the offer and help.  Respectfully yours, William. L. Allison.  If you can help me, please email me at night_train46@yahoo.com
Marine Bombing Squadron Six-Thirteen > http://www.vmb-613.com/

Greetings from the officers and men of Marine Bombing Squadron Six-Thirteen!  My name is Robert Yanacek.  I am a retired Marine and the website administrator for the Marine Bombing Squadron Six-Thirteen (VMB-613) website.  I have never been to Kawjalein, but my father served there with VMB-613.

VMB-613 arrived on Kwajalein in December of 1944 and departed in October 1945, following the surrender of the Japanese.  Their missions during the war entailed surveillance and strikes against Jaluit, Maleolap, Wotje, Mille, Ponape (Pohnpei), Kusaie, Ocean and Nauru.  Since 1945 a number of our members have returned to Kwajalein, most notably, a group of about 20 during the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the battle for Kwajalein and Roi-Namur.

Our website covers the history of our squadron from its forming in October of 1943, through its decommissioning in November of 1945.  Our website currently consists of over three hundred pages of text and photographs.  Many of the photographs on the website were taken while the squadron was based on Kwajalein.
 
Please contact me!  I am an American citizen and long time resident of Majuro, Marshall Islands. I have owned and operated a SCUBA and Marine business for 24 years and have conducted extensive research into the Marshalls campaign. I am making a list of every USA serviceman lost in the Campaign, with a story for each. I currently have over 700 aviators, besides losses at sea and on the ground. Currently looking for more info on 12FEB44 Japanese bombing at Roi-Namur and individual losses by MAG-31 and Mag-22 on missions. Please contact me!! Matt Holly PO Box 319 Majuro, MH 96960 or email me at Aquamar@ntamar.net.
Searching for contact who may have served with Sherwood "Brooksy" Brooks, U.S. Marine Combat Aviator in VMF-111, MAG 31 1943-45  Dear veterans:  My dad, Sherwood "Brooksy" Brooks (1922-1975) was a U.S. Marine combat aviator in VMF-111, MAG 31 1943-1945. His squadron was stationed on various islands in the Marshall and Gilbert chains, such as Eniwetak, Kwajalein, Makin, Majuro, Millie, Roi, etc. (I hope I have this right...I'm going from memory, and some of those might have been targets!).  I'd be very interested in making contact with anyone who may have served with my dad or with other members of VMF-111. I remember him telling me about the F4U Corsair (I'm now a pilot myself.) and about dive-bombing mission against Jap islands.  Also, Lt. Thalin and Lt. Pimlott, who were lost on different flights. On one occasion, his rudder was partially shot away by Jap A.A. fire. "Whoa! Brooksy!  Your tail's gone!" one of his squadron mates said on the radio.  My dad said he made the most perfect landing of his life after that.  Must have been pretty intense.  I can hardly believe that a bunch of 20-somethings were actually given Corsairs to fly.  I'd love to communicate with anyone about my dad and his squadron.

Sincerely, Sherwood "Duke" Brooks, agent, Newport Bay Realty, Inc., Ocean City, MD, (410) 213-9318, (443) 365-9005 (c), NewportBayRealty@aol.com
Willie Cleo Thompson

Shermie, Thank you for all of your hard work and efforts in helping obtain information about my uncle, PFC Willie Cleo Thompson  I really appreciate your kindness and dedication Thank you very much, Winston Wilson, 140 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill Estates, Bardstown, Kentucky 40004

WWII Vought F4U Corsair

VMF-111 Devil Dogs

After familiarizing themselves with the new aircraft the squadron then proceeded to the Marshall Islands (Kwajalein Atoll) at the end of January 1944 arriving at Roi-Namur Island February 3rd. After the bombing, the Squadron moved to Makin in the Gilberts where daily "milk runs" were made bombing Mille, Majuro and Wotje Islands in the Marshalls through the spring of 1944. The "Devil Dogs" soon commenced daily attacks on the remaining Japanese held bases in this group. Taking on the role as a fighter-bomber squadron. Dive bombing and strafing missions as well as other attacks that were pressed incessantly on each and every one of the strongly defended airfields and supply bases in the area. Before long, VMF-111 had a leading record of number of missions, tonnage of bombs dropped and miles flown over water in the completion of these attacks. They were the first concentrated attacks to be made in World War II on previously held Japanese territory, and it was the beginning of a new policy in the Pacific offensive of bypassing and neutralizing numerous strong points.  Little can be found of the squadron's history after the campaign for the Marshalls.

The famous "Ole 122", a Chance Vought F4U-1 of VMF-111, "Devil Dogs", completed 100 dive-bombing mission against Japanese positions of the Marshall  Islands.  Ole 122 logged more than 80,000 miles and 400 flying house without having to return to base for mechanical trouble.  Note: 100 mission markers under the cockpit "Ole 122".


Capt. John Frank Moore Jr., the pilot in aircraft 104
Photograph provided by
Leroy Rice




 

The Commanding Officers Building On Wallis Island, south of the equator,
headquarters' of the Squadron Marine Aircraft Group 31.  This Is the island
occupied  MAG-31 until they were transported during the  invasion of the
Marshall Islands in Feb. 1944.   Wallis Island had a large airstrip where the
F4U-1 Corsairs did air patrol duty.


VMF-111s over Makin Island
Message received April 2004:  My dad, Capt. John Frank Moore Jr.
is in the pilot in aircraft 104.  William Moore, WMoore56@aol.com.


VMF-111 Devil Dogs Patch

Does anyone know Ben S. or William Lovelace?  My name is Ben S. Lovelace, III. My Grandfather was Ben S. Lovelace, Sr. from Crisp, NC and he was a US Marine aircraft mechanic (aircraft armored) on Kwajalein during WWII. I am writing because my grandfather passed away in 1982 without speaking of his military service at all and I am trying to piece together a record of his service for a family history that I am researching. I was wondering if anyone out there knew of my grandfather or of his 1st cousin William Lovelace. I do know that he was injured (I believe at Kwajalein) by a 500 pound bomb that fell on him and broke his back during a loading accident. He also served on Vira Island and Wallis Island. Any help that you can give me would be greatly appreciated. Feel free to contact me if you have any suggestions.  Sincerely, Ben Lovelace treslovelace1@hotmail.com, 336-722-7911
I am searching for my father who was a WWII Marine. The two pictures of him at right are of him.  I have been told that the background in the pictures may be Wallis Island. Please contact me if you recognize him from the days of WWII.  Any help would be appreciated.  Bob Fortelny, 714-4571945, Fortelny1@aol.com

Tracing my father's PFC James Leatherbarrow travels through the South Pacific  My father joined the Marines in 1942. After basic training at Parris Island, he was sent to Ordinance School at Quantico, Va. (where he and my mother were married). In April of 1943, he was shipped to Camp Elliott, Jacques Farm, Camp Pendleton and Oceanside, where he remained till early 1944, at which time he was sent to Roi-Namur of Kwajalein Atoll. From there, he went to Saipan and then to Okinawa.  My father died in 1972 and my mother recently died. For years (since my dads death) my family has been attempting to trace my dads travels through the South Pacific. Unfortunately, when he was alive, he'd never talk about it. He'd became angry when he saw some war movies, as he claimed they glamorized the war and that they lacked the sounds and smells. That was about the only time he commented about the war.  Shortly after my dad died, we attempted to get his service records but were advised by the VA, that his records were lost in a fire in St. Louis. I recently found about 200 letters my dad had sent my mom from Quantico to Okinawa, to wars end.  According to the timeframe on these letters (most of which are censored), I've concluded he was part of the 4th Marine Division. His return address changed throughout the war. On a letter written on February 21,1944, which I think originated on Kwajalein, the return address is as follows:  PFC James Leatherbarrow, 15th Defense Bn. 90MM Group, Battery "D", C/O Fleet Post Office, SF, CA.  I also found some old photos of my dads, at Parris Island, Oceanside, CA, Saipan and Okinawa, all apparently taken during the war.  Is there any way I can determine if in fact he was part of the 4th Marine Division and accurately determine his travels with that Division, through the South Pacific?  If this may be of any help, his serial number was 392980.  Respectfully, the very proud son of a Marine, James Leatherbarrow Jr., leatherbarrow@shorefast.net
Does anyone know Ben S. or William Lovelace?  My name is Ben S. Lovelace, III. My Grandfather was Ben S. Lovelace, Sr. from Crisp, NC and he was a US Marine aircraft mechanic (aircraft armored) on Kwajalein during WWII. I am writing because my grandfather passed away in 1982 without speaking of his military service at all and I am trying to piece together a record of his service for a family history that I am researching. I was wondering if anyone out there knew of my grandfather or of his 1st cousin William Lovelace. I do know that he was injured (I believe at Kwajalein) by a 500 pound bomb that fell on him and broke his back during a loading accident. He also served on Vira Island and Wallis Island. Any help that you can give me would be greatly appreciated. Feel free to contact me if you have any suggestions.  Sincerely, Ben Lovelace treslovelace1@hotmail.com, 336-722-7911
My father joined the Marines in 1942. After Basic Training at Parris Island, he was sent to Ordinance School at Quantico, Va. (where he and my mother were married). In April of 43 he was shipped to Camp Elliott ,Jacques Farm, Camp Pendleton and Oceanside, where he remained till early 1944, at which time he was sent to Roi-Namur of Kwajalein Atoll. From there he went to Saipan and then to Okinawa.

My father died in 1972 and my mother recently died. For years (since my dads death) my family has been attempting to trace my dads travels through the South Pacific. Unfortunately, when he was alive, he'd never talk about it. He'd became angry when he saw some war movies, as he claimed they glamorized the war and that they lacked the sounds and smells. That was about the only time he commented about the war..

Shortly after my dad died, we attempted to get his service records but were advised by the VA, that his records were lost in a fire in St. Louis.

I recently found about 200 letters my dad had sent my mom from Quantico to Okinawa, to wars end. According to the timeframe on these letters (most of which are censored) , I've concluded he was part of the 4th Marine Division. His return address changed throughout the war. On a letter written on February 21,1944, which I think originated on Kwajalein, the return address is as follows:

PFC James Leatherbarrow, 15th Defense Bn. 90MM Group, Battery "D", C/O Fleet Post Office, San Francisco Cal.

I also found some old photos of my dads, at Parris Island, Oceanside California, Saipan and Okinawa, all apparently taken during the war.  Is there any way I can determine if in fact he was part of the 4th Marine Division and accurately determine his travels with that Division, through the South Pacific? If this may be of any help, his serial number was 392980.

Respectfully, the very proud son of a Marine, James Leatherbarrow Jr., jleatherbarrow@shorefast.net
WWII VET Links
 Japanese Maps of the Marshall Islands
 Medal of Honor Recipient, Private Richard Keith Sorenson
 Kwajalein Atoll World War II Historic Photos
 Stars & Stripes  Enter the word Kwaj in the search field to find the latest news items about Kwajalein.
 The Battle for Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands, Jan-Feb 1944
 Roi Namur, Penetrating the Outer Ring, The Fighting Fourth Marine Division of World War II
 The Marshall Islands Operations, prepared by the historical division, U.S. Marine Corps
 "Welcome home" for 20 Marines killed in WWII, December 18, 1999
 Underwater hero "Billy" Hughes Dies In 1944, he rescued a Navy diver.


Provided by Jim Wodke


Provided by Jim Wodke

In Memory of Bob Hope


Marines attack a blockhouse on Roi-Namur


World War II - Part 1 World War II -  Part 2 World War II -  Part 3


The effects of pre-invasion bombardment on Kwajalein


 


Picture taken 1955
provided by Jim Wodke


Ground Zero - Hiroshima, August 6 1945
WWII comes to an end
 


Pictures taken 1955
provided by Jim Wodke


Memorial on Kwajalein in honor of the US Marines 2nd Raider Battalion

tank.jpg (8043 bytes)
Japanese tank - Guam
Photo taken by Shermie Wiehe

Saipan.jpg (10441 bytes)
Suicide Cliffs - Saipan
Photo taken by Shermie Wiehe


Photo provided by Glen Eicher

Photo provided by Glen Eicher, my good friend and boss 1978-1980


 


Photo provided by Glen Eicher


The 302nd Seabee Battalion was a pontoon causeway outfit detachment that made 8 first day landings in the Pacific.
Above is a picture of the 302nd detachment at Kwajalein.




Link to the story > 6th Special Naval Construction Battalion- Seabees - PDF file

Pictures of Naha & Shuri - Page 1, Page 2 - provided by
Joe Garofalo

Pictures of Seabees - Okinawa

Photos of Kwajalein - World War II

The 1940s War Years

Chronicle of the U.S.S. Crescent City

The Taking Of Iwo Jima
 

Shermie's Place